Allan Quatermain Books in Order (with Ayesha, and Umslopogaas)

Allan Quatermain is a professional hunter and adventurer created by Victorian writer H. Rider Haggard.

Reading the Allan Quatermain, Ayesha, and Umslopogaas stories in Order

As Allan Quatermain crossovers with Ayesha and Umpslopogaas, two other creations of Haggard, the following guide includes those two other series.

A little warning! The Allan Quatermain series, being from the Victorian era, has been criticized for its depictions of non-Europeans and womanhood. At the same time, the books are also been recognized to contain some progressive ideas and representation for their time period.

Allan Quatermain Series in Publication Order

In his first appearance, English-born adventurer Allan Quatermain has just turned 55. But Haggard will explore different periods of Allan’s life, spanning from 18 to 68. Following is the publication order of Allan Quatermain’s series. See below for a chronological order of his adventures!

King Solomon’s Mines (1885)
Allan Quatermain (1887)
Maiwa’s Revenge: or, The War of the Little Hand (1888)
Allan’s Wife and other tales (1889) with “Allan’s Wife“, “Hunter Quatermain’s Story“,
A Tale of Three Lions“, “Long Odds
Marie (1912)
Child of Storm (1913)
The Holy Flower (1915)
The Ivory Child (1916)
Finished (1917)
The Ancient Allan (1920)
She and Allan (1920)
Heu-heu: or, The Monster (1924)
The Treasure of the Lake (1926)
Allan and the Ice Gods (1927)

Illustration by Thure de Thulstrup from H. Rider Haggard’s Maiwa’s Revenge, Chapter VII.

Ayesha Series in Publication Order

Ayesha (pronounced ‘Assha’), also known as “She-Who-Must-Be-Obeyed,” is the monarch of Kôr, a lost African city and the central character of four novels by H. Rider Haggard.

While book two is a direct sequel to the first one, the third and fourth books are prequels.

She: A History of Adventure (1886)
Ayesha, the Return of She (1905)
She and Allan (1920)
Wisdom’s Daughter (1923)

Umslopogaas novels

Umslopogaas, a Zulu Warrior, is another recurring figure of H. Rider Haggard’s novel making his first appearance as an elderly in Allan Quatermain, before his origin and early life are retraced in Nada the Lily.

Allan Quatermain (1887)
Nada the Lily (1892)
She and Allan (1920)

“She”, Illustration by Maurice Greiffenhagen

Chronology of Haggard’s Allan Quatermain, Ayesha, and Umslopogaas stories

Wisdom’s Daughter (1923)
Nada the Lily (1892)
Marie (1912)
The Ghost Kings (1908)
– “Allan’s Wife” (1887, Short story published in the collection Allan’s Wife and other tales)
Child of Storm (1913)
– “A Tale of Three Lions” (1887, Short story published in the collection Allan’s Wife and other tales)
Maiwa’s Revenge: or, The War of the Little Hand (1888)
– “Hunter Quatermain’s Story” (1887, Short story published in Allan’s Wife and other tales)
– “Long Odds” (1887, Short story published in Allan’s Wife and other tales)
Allan and The Holy Flower (1915)
Heu-heu: or, The Monster (1924)
She and Allan (1920)
The Treasure of the Lake (1926)
The Ivory Child (1916)
– “Black Heart and White Heart – A Zulu Idyll” (1896, Short story published in the collection Elissa)
– “Magepa the Buck” (1921, Short story published in the collection Smith and the Pharaohs)
Finished (1917)
King Solomon’s Mines (1885)
She: A History of Adventure (1886)
The Ancient Allan (1920)
Allan and the Ice Gods (1927)
Allan Quatermain (1887)
Ayesha, the Return of She (1905)

Though this is where the story of Allan Quatermain by Haggard stopped, writer Alan Moore and artist Kevin O’Neill used the character in the comic book series The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, which can be read as a non-canon follow-up to the book series for Quatermain.

Does the Allan Quatermain books need to be read in order?

As H. Rider Haggard did not write Allan’s adventures in order, you don’t have to either! Though, it should be noted that if some books are true standalone, there are two important series in the Quatermain series.

The Zulu Trilogy consists of: Marie (1912), Child of Storm (1913), and Finished (1917) and deals with Quatermain becoming entangled in Zikali’s revenge, a dwarf wizard. Those novels serve as prequels to the duology King Solomon’s Mines (1885) and Allan Quatermain (1887).

Also, She and Allan (1920) is a crossover between Quatermain and Ayesha, and is also populated with several recurring characters such as Hans, Umslopogaas, and Zikali from the Quatermain series, and Bilali, Ayesha’s faithful minister. It is a prequel to the other two previous Ayesha books.

Richard Chamberlain and Sharon Stones as Allan Quatermain and Jesse Huston in “Allan Quatermain And The Lost City Of Gold”, the sequel to “King Solomon’s Mines.”

More about Allan Quatermain

Who is Allan Quatermain?

H. Rider Haggard’s hero Allan Quatermain appears in eighteen books spanning fifty years of his life. He was quite the adventurer!

The English-born professional big game hunter was raised in South Africa by his widowed father, a Christian missionary. He has been married twice, but both times he was quickly widowed and had a son, Harry.

Allan is unrivaled in his field of shooting. Allan, on the other hand, does it for financial reasons, to make a livelihood, and gets no pleasure in it. He admitted to playing a role in the destruction of Africa’s wild open spaces.

The Men who inspired the creation of Allan Quatermain

Haggard lived several years in South Africa, where his father sent him to take up an unpaid position as a government official in the hope that his son would make a career for himself. There, the writer met real-life adventures who influenced him and served him as the basis for his character.

Most notably, British explorer and professional hunter Frederick Selous and American scout and world-traveling adventurer Frederick Russell Burnham influenced him both.

Selous’ travels in South-central Africa helped to gain knowledge of the country later known as Rhodesia, while Frederick Russell Burnham lived many adventures in search of excitement and fortune, and served in the British South Africa Company and in the British Army.

Allan Quatermain in film and television

Quite the popular hero, Allan Quatermain has appeared in many films and television throughout the years. The first adaptation seems to be Allan Quatermain (1919), an apparently lost silent film starring Albert Lawrence.

In total, there are approximately ten movies showcasing the adventures of Allan Quatermain, along with one miniseries in which the character has been brought to life by many actors, including Richard Chamberlain, Sean Connery, Cedric Hardwicke, and Patrick Swayze, among others.

Henry Rider Haggard, author of Allan Quatermain – Src.

About Henry Rider Haggard, the creator of Allan Quatermain

A brief biography of Henry Rider Haggard

Henry Rider Haggard (22 June 1856 – 14 May 1925) was an English novelist best known for creating the legendary literary character Allan Quatermain. Haggard was raised in rural England and attended Ipswich Grammar School and London University. He worked as a government employee in South Africa throughout his formative years, which laid the foundation for his subsequent literary studies of the continent.

Henry Rider Haggard’s literary journey started in periodicals and newspapers before he wrote his first non-fiction book Cetywayo and His White Neighbours, a critical examination of Britain’s policies in South Africa. Two years later he published his debut novel, “Dawn,” in 1884. However, he penned “King Solomon’s Mines,” one of his most famous novels in 1885, followed quickly by She: A History of Adventure (1886), which introduced the character Ayesha. His reputation as a writer was built, thanks to these two books.

H. Rider Haggard was a prolific author who over 50 novels, essays, and short stories, he became a pioneer of the lost world literary genre and had a major impact on fellow writers and readers for many decades.

The Legacy of Haggard and Allan Quatermain

Haggard has an influence on American pulp writers, including Edgar Rice Burroughs, Robert E. Howard, Talbot Mundy, Philip José Farmer.

But his most famous legacy took place on the big screen, as Allan Quatermain, it is said, was the template for one of the most, if not the most famous fictional adventurers on the big screen: Indiana Jones!

For more adventures set in the Victorian era, you can try the Flashman Papers Series.