Jane Austen’s Dragons Books in Order, A Regency gaslamp dragon fantasy adventure

This is Jane Austen… With Dragons! Written by author Maria Grace, the Jane Austen’s Dragons Series is an ongoing Regency gaslamp dragon fantasy adventure with a touch of romance!

Described as “Anne McCaffrey meets Jane Austen“, the series is set in the Regency era, where many dragons of different shapes and sizes exist. Most people don’t know about them or the Pendragon Treaty that keeps peace between humans and dragons. Only individuals with extraordinary hearing, such as Fitzwilliam Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet, possess the ability to hear and communicate with dragons.

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Jane Austen’s Dragons Complete Reading Order

Enter a world with dragons in the Regency era! Start by reading the stories in the order they were published for your first visit. If you prefer a different adventure, follow the chronological order.

Jane Austen’s Dragons Novels in Publication Order

Pemberley: Mr. Darcy’s Dragon (2016)
Longbourn: Dragon Entail (2017)
Netherfield: Rogue Dragon (2018)
A Proper Introduction to Dragons (2018)
The Dragons of Kellynch (2020)
Kellynch: Dragon Persuasion (2020)
Dragons Beyond the Pale (2021)
Dragon Keepers’ Cotillion (2021)
The Turnspit Dragon and other Tales of the Blue Order (2021)
The Dragons of Pemberley (2022)
Miss Georgiana and the Dragon (2022)
Here There Be Dragons (2023)

The Jane Austen’s Dragons series is still ongoing and more books are coming!

Jane Austen’s Dragons Stories in Chronological Order, including the short stories!

Most of the short stories listed below are collected in The Turnspit Dragon and other Tales of the Blue Order, except for The Buttercross Dragon (available on ebook), T’Was the Night Before, A Touch of Christmas Mayhem, Christmas Pudding Chaos (available on the author’s website).

Worth Her Salt – Short story set in Spring 1787, prior to the events of A Proper Introduction to Dragons.
Invitations – Short story set in late winter 1795, prior to the events of A Proper Introduction to Dragons
A Proper Introduction to Dragons – Novel set between April 1801 and January 1803
The Benefits of Sea-Bathing – Short story set in May 1804, between the events of a Proper Introduction to Dragons and The Dragon of Kellynch.
The Dragons of Kellynch – Novel Set between May 1809 and Late September 1809
Lost and Found – Short story set in July 1809, during the events of The Dragon of Kellynch
Pemberley: Mr. Darcy’s Dragon – Novel with no precise date, but set around October-November 1811, as it revisits Pride and Prejudice
Longbourn: Dragon Entail – Novel with no precise date, but set in 1811, as it revisits Pride and Prejudice
Netherfield: Rogue Dragon – Novel with no precise date, but around March and October 1812 as it revisits Pride and Prejudice
A Friend in Need – Short story set in May 1812, during the events of Netherfield: Rogue Dragon
In a Fit of Temper – Short story set in Spring 1812, between the events of Netherfield: Rogue Dragon and Kellynch: Dragon Persuasion
The Buttercross Dragon – Short story set between September and November 1812
The Turnspit Dragon – Short story set May 1813, between the events of Netherfield: Rogue Dragon and Kellynch: Dragon Persuasion
Kellynch: Dragon Persuasion – Novel set between Early June 1814 and November 1814
The Butler’s Pantry – Short Story set in Spring 1814, during the events of Kellynch: Dragon Persuasion
Dragons Beyond the Pale – Novel set in January-February 1815
Dragon Keepers’ Cotillion – Novel set between March and May 1815
Motherly Instincts – Short Story set in April 1815, during the events of Dragon Keeper’s Cotillion
Less than a Keeper – Short Story set in May 1815, following the events of Dragon Keeper’s Cotillion
Not Handsome Enough – Short Story set in September 1815, after the events of Dragon Keeper’s Cotillion
The Dragons of Pemberley – Novel set in June-​July 1815
Miss Georgiana and the Dragon – Novel set between April and August 1815
Here There Be Dragons – Novel set in August-September 1815
T’Was the Night Before – Short story set in December 1824
A Touch of Christmas Mayhem – Short story set in December 1826
Christmas Pudding Chaos – Short story set in November-December 1827

More Information on Jane Austen’s Dragons

Dubbed “A top fun comfort read” by Gail Carriger, the early books in Jane Austen’s Dragons series reimagine Pride and Prejudice, expanding on Jane Austen’s world and the Bennet family. Maria Grace keeps key aspects from the classic novel but diverges at times, using characters, settings, and dialogues to weave a unique story.

The focus shifts from the marital pursuits of the five Bennet daughters to the family’s duty as guardians of the dragon Longbourne. Elizabeth emerges as a skilled dragon keeper, her instincts often making her more attuned to dragons than to people.

In this Regency World, a variety of dragon species exists, ranging from small ones that could be mistaken for birds to the more typical, larger dragons. These intelligent and proud creatures frequently reveal their emotions clearly during interactions. Similar to people, they play a role in this world and are part of a class system, with their size and power determining their rank. England’s dragons are categorized based on both their size and the shape of their heads.

What inspired Jane Austen’s Dragons?

During an interview published on Jane Austen Summer Program, Author Maria Grace explained how the whole concept of the series, was born:

The Jane Austen’s Dragon series was born at a pizza buffet with my three (then much younger) sons. I’ve always kicked around ideas with my family, and that day we were just getting silly. One of the boys suggested “What if there were dragons?” which is an entirely reasonable thing for a teenage boy to say when confronted with Jane Austen.

What one might argue is less reasonable is that I took the suggestion seriously and we

immediately launched into a very animated discussion about how that might work. Clearly, the dragons had to be hidden from plain sight since they were not included in the original text. . . somehow, they had to be there in the background.

Over many more slices of pizza and several false starts, the Pendragon Treaty and the Blue Order which governs the British dragons took shape. Once we established how the dragons disguised themselves and what sort of agreement they had with human society, working that into the fabric of Regency culture posed surprisingly few challenges. If anything, dragons helped make some of the societal conventions of the era make more sense (difficult as that may be to believe.) The whole world has ended up working so well that I just released book 12 in the series!

For more adventures with dragons, Anne McCaffrey’s Dragonriders of Pern series will certainly be of interest. You could also be charmed by The Enchanted Forest Chronicles by Patricia Wrede.